Home » Dutch Safety Board » Why Did #Russia Bring a Heavy Anti-Aircraft Missile to #EasternUkraine in July 2014? Mark Solonin’s Answer

Why Did #Russia Bring a Heavy Anti-Aircraft Missile to #EasternUkraine in July 2014? Mark Solonin’s Answer

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Although the theory of Mark Solonin outlined here: http://www.solonin.org/article_buk-na-donbasse-zachem sounds a bit complicated and thus contradicts the criterion of Occam’s Razor, I find it an interesting explanation of Russia’s shooting of the #MH17 on 17 July 2014. At least, this narrative resolves a number of confusing puzzles in the course of events – above all the question of why a particularly high flying type of Russian anti-aircraft missile suddenly appeared in the #Donbass – although lighter missile types would have been sufficient to shoot down Ukrainian military planes.
In short, Solonin’s theory seems to be that the peculiarly far-reaching #Buk missile was initially brought to Eastern Ukraine, by the Kremlin, to secretly shoot down not a Ukrainian fighter or transport aircraft, but a RUSSIAN PASSENGER plane, flying on high altitude. This incident would then be presented by Moscow as an act of anti-Russian terrorism which would be blamed on Kyiv and provide a pretext for more aggressive behavior by Russia towards Ukraine – maybe for a full-scale official invasion with regular Russian troops. However, the operation’s initial idea somehow did not work out, and the tired, nervous and overworked BUK crew shot down instead another plane – to get a.s.a.p. back home to Russia. More details in Solonin’s Russian text http://www.solonin.org/article_buk-na-donbasse-zachem which would be worth translating into English.
While I am not sure Solonin’s story is true, it looks neat, logical and comprehensive. The Kremlin’s behavior 2014 would fit the pattern of the 1999 Russian apartment blocs bombings described in books by John B. Dunlop (ibidem-Verlag) and David Satter (Yale University Press).

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